An October Letter from Lance…..

Friends, October 6, 2020

One of the biggest weather adjustments we have to make here is how the seasons come and go.  It’s sure not like Texas, where Summer is always an early guest and has a late departure.  Here, Summer is very lazy and comes late with no real spice.  But Autumn kicks the door down and we had heavy showers, temps falling from the 80’s to the ’60s, the first day of Fall.  There are flashes of color here and there in the forest, and huge dry oak leaves covering the sidewalk in Lynden, the very cool little “Dutch” city that’s about 10 miles away.  Huge 40 ft windmills welcome you to downtown, just one street, no traffic lights, with the old, old buildings still used, and the Dutch Bakery headlining one corner with tasty goodies that are truly sinful.  You’ll see big pots loaded and crowned with flowers on every corner – it seems like you are in Europe and it’s a very enjoyable place to have lunch or even get the car washed at the De Wagen Wasserij.  The fire season has been horrible.  We had several big fires here in Washington, but California fires were the worst and both brought us days of smokey haze when we would get a slight headache just walking to the mailbox.  It was nasty.  Sending out a “God Bless You” to our friends and Skywatchers there.  Out on the backroads now, it’s very quiet.  Some days we drive for miles not seeing anyone else on the road.  Lots of red apples are on the trees now, and you can’t miss the huge orange globes in the pumpkin patches. The corn is high in field after field, and we wonder when they will cut it.  The raspberry bushes are tired and woven into hoops so they will grow in a manner easier to harvest next year.  We seldom see the farmhands working, but know it’s a huge chore – must be a million plants just around here.  We got some good news on the environmental front.  Remember Tahlequah, the Orca who carried her dead calf around for two weeks?   She just had a healthy new boy who is frisky and will hopefully make it.  Another female Orca also had a calf last month, and the scientists are more than delighted to see this southern pod of whales grow as numbers have been declining over the past few years.  A lack of food had been one big problem since the rivers where the salmon spawn have been dammed up to make electricity which we need.  But the cost is high, the salmon population has declined in a big way, and now a big debate is going on here in Washington state:  Is the electricity worth it when we are destroying the salmon runs and thus the Orca population down the road?  I’ll pay more for electricity; I vote for the rivers to run freely if they want my vote.  The bad news is more murder hornets have been found, the total is 15 now.  They caught one alive in a net and tried to glue a little tracker chip on it’s back, but the glue failed to work, so they will try again.  They want the chip so they can track one to the nest as now they are certain there is one and destroy it.

I’ve completed the 2021 Datebook, and I suspect you are ready to look ahead, too, after such a difficult year begins to finally wind down.  You’ll see details on ordering your copy in this issue of Skywatch.  After publishing these lists of kiss and quack days and getting feedback from readers all over the country, I want you to know how helpful they are whenever you are making important appointments with professionals, and especially with doctors and dentists.  From all the reports coming in, the energy in the Skywatch is even more important than the aspects in your personal chart in most cases.  On kiss days everything usually goes as planned with no surprises, and successes are much more common than having these matters scheduled on quack days.  All appointments with lawyers, therapists, financial planners are more likely to give you the help you need on kiss days.  Order a copy and share info with loved ones and friends.  Leslie and I are well, masked up, and sending you our best wishes.

Lance


Research & Analysis by
W. Lance Ferguson
NOVEMBER 2020
Celebrating 32 years of publication

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